10 Top Conservation Tech Innovations From 2017

By Sue Palminteri Technology is changing how we investigate and protect planet Earth. The increased portability and reduced cost of data collection and synthesis tools, for instance—from visual and acoustic sensors to DNA sequencers, online mapping platforms and apps for sharing photos—have rapidly transformed how we research and conserve the natural world. These tools afford research and conservation projects across the globe an unprecedented capacity to access, collect, organize, analyze and convey information. But these new tools are being developed and deployed so quickly, it can be hard to stay on

Prince Harry Becomes President of Conservation Group

Prince Harry is joining African Parks as president of the South Africa-based wildlife conservation organization, according to an announcement made Wednesday during a BBC Radio 4 program guest-edited by the royal. Prince Harry has been working with African Parks since July 2016, when he assisted in the translocation of a group of elephants and other wildlife in Malawi, where the organization manages three protected areas. As President, Prince Harry will work with the leadership of the African Parks, according to Robert-Jan van Ogtrop, the conservation group’s chairman. “Prince Harry will work closely with our Board and Peter Fearnhead our CEO, to advance our mission in protecting Africa’s national parks,” said

The Curious Case of the Phantom Hippo Teeth

By Laura G. Shields Think of the illegal wildlife trade, and elephant tusks and rhino horns come to mind. But another of the world’s largest land mammals is slipping under the radar: the common hippopotamus ( Hippopotamus amphibius ) may be at greater risk than previously believed, according to a new analysis of the international trade in hippo teeth. Hippo ivory, from their large canines and incisors, is an affordable alternative to elephant ivory (international trade in elephant ivory is increasingly

Top 25 Most Endangered Primates: the Most Current List

By Mike Gaworecki Earlier this month, a new orangutan species discovered in Sumatra, Indonesia officially became the eighth great ape species known to exist on Earth—and, thanks to habitat destruction caused by the expansion of human development, it instantly became one of the most endangered great apes on the planet, too. There are believed to be fewer than 800 Batang Toru orangutans ( Pongo tapanuliensis ), as the new species is called (it’s also sometimes referred to as the Tapanuli orangutan), all living in a degraded primary forest on Sumatra increasingly surrounded and bisected by roads. But

Trump Budget Undercuts U.S. Commitment to Global Wildlife Conservation

By William H. Funk Proposed funding cuts to environmental programs in President Trump’s proposed 2018 budget have drawn anxious attention from around the world. But while the biggest numbers deal with rolling back the Obama administration’s climate change initiatives, more subtle withdrawals of federal support from lesser known international programs threaten the continued existence of

Free Online Tool Lets You Assess Dam Projects Around the World

By Claire Salisbury Mega-dam construction is booming around the world, with promoters hyping hydropower as a green, renewable source of energy and a means of curbing climate change . But as these dams are built in the Amazon , Mekong and elsewhere, they’re doing great environmental and social damage and their green credentials are no longer adding up . For example, high quantities of greenhouse gases are released

Graffiti Campaign Inspires Protection of Endangered Rhinos

By Michael Tatarski Throughout the month of March, a unique graffiti campaign popped up on the walls of several streets in downtown Ho Chi Minh City, the hyperactive commercial capital of Vietnam. The works differed from the usual tags and designs that adorn urban areas around the world. The graffiti pieces, 17 in all, carry a simple message: “Save the rhinos” or ” Cứu tê giác” in Vietnamese. Vietnam is home to one of the largest African rhino horn consumer bases in the world, in addition to being a key transit point for shipments to China. Users of rhino horn believe it can cure various illnesses, in addition to a number of other supposed health benefits