The Trump Administration’s ‘Dishonest’ Attack on Fuel-Economy Standards

By John R. PlattThe Trump administration’s plan to freeze fuel-economy standards is “the most spectacular regulatory flip-flop in history,” said a retired EPA engineer who helped to develop new the standards under the Obama administration.”These standards weren’t going to be the ultimate solution for solving the climate problem, but they were a very, very important first step,”

These Butterflies Have Lawyers

By John R. Platt Don’t mess with Texas butterflies. They have lawyers. This week attorneys representing the North American Butterfly Association filed a suit against the Trump administration for its plan to build a section of the U.S.-Mexico border wall through a significant portion of the National Butterfly Center in Mission, Texas. The construction plan would cut off the organization’s access “to no less than two-thirds of the Butterfly Center property” just north of the Rio Grande River, according to the lawsuit. The lawsuit was officially filed Monday

Can Plastic Ever Be Made Illegal?

By Danielle Corcione I thought I knew what garbage looked like. Then I arrived in Bangalore, the third-largest city in India. There was trash almost everywhere you looked. Plastic bottles, food packaging and other waste that could’ve potentially been recycled contaminated the landscape, even in people’s front- and backyards. When I’d ride into the city from the ashram where I was staying in the countryside, I’d inhale toxic fumes of garbage piles burning and observe wild animals rummaging through fields of trash. During my first day on Commercial Street, one of the

The Lesser Prairie-Chicken: Gone With the Wind?

By Bryce McElhaney North on U.S. 270 to Woodward, Oklahoma, wind turbines own the horizon. They hover above rusting barns, cattle-guards and the barbed-wire fences that protect private land. When standing below, you feel the massive blades swoosh like flyswatters cutting through the air. As the wind picks up, the blades spin faster and the machines emit a soft mechanical whine: the sound of power generated by nature. The town, home to 12,000 people, lies in the

6 Thrilling New Environmental Books for November

By John R. Platt The nights are getting shorter, the days are getting cooler and the bookstores are stocking up on great new titles. Here are six new environmentally themed books coming our way this November, addressing such issues as pesticides , poaching and climate change . Check ’em out: 1. A Precautionary Tale: How One Small Town Banned

Florida Faces 3 Toxic Crises Triggered by Flooding

By Dipika Kadaba Ah, Florida—home to famous natural landscapes and amazing wildlife , but also to more than 20 million people and billion-dollar industries. Decades of booming development in Florida—all of it built in the path of Atlantic hurricanes —have brought to a head some toxic problems the state still struggles to solve. Every major flooding event, like the one following this year’s Hurricane Irma , leaches toxic waste into people’s homes and drinking water . Florida is particularly vulnerable to storm surges and flooding from hurricanes like Irma. Scroll down to explore the natural disaster risks facing Florida and increasing its residents’ toxic risks: Threat #1: Superfund Sites The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ( EPA ‘s)

By Tomorrow, We Will Have Consumed More Resources So Far This Year Than the Planet Is Capable of Regenerating

By John R. Platt We humans use a lot of stuff — so much stuff, in fact, that we consume more in a year than the planet is capable of regenerating . That wasn’t a problem until a few decades ago. Back in 1987 the “overshoot” date for Earth’s resources was December 19, less than two weeks before the end of the year. That’s not too bad, right? Thirty years later, however, that date has moved up—and up—and up. Last year what has now been dubbed Earth Overshoot Day had moved all the way up to August 8. This year it’s even earlier. August 2. That means that by the end of 2017 we will have used the