Dropping the ball: how the sports industry affects biodiversity

Tourism and energy and mining, oh my.

One year on: U.S. business is still committed to the Paris Agreement

Trump says we’re out. This is why we’re still in.

4 things you didn’t know elephants do for you

On top of being amazing creatures, elephants actually make life better for all of us, sometimes in surprising ways.

Marine parks: big or small? Both, says oceans expert

What should marine protected areas look like, and how large should they be?

Tesla Powerpacks Balance the European Grid in REstore’s New Virtual Power Plant

On the site of an old coal mine in Belgium's only national park, Centrica Business Solutions’ flexibility provider REstore has launched a 32-megawatt virtual power plant, with a distribution-grid-connected 18.2-megawatt Tesla Powerpack storage system. The project took six months from inception to operation; the battery installation took about five weeks

Energy Jobs: Tesla Flattens Exec Roles, Juergen Steps Down at SolarWorld, Plus ComEd, AMS and More

As the old newspaper adage goes, “If it bleeds, it leads.” And if it’s Tesla that is bleeding executives, of course we’ll start there. Elon Musk said in a company memo that he’s flattening out the executive structure at the company, according to the The Wall Street Journal. But it’s hardly a sudden hemorrhage. Axios has a nice laundry list

SkS Analogy 12 – A Sinking ship reaches new heights

Tag Line A sinking ship reaches new heights. Elevator Statement For a sinking ship the stern may be unusually low, the bow unusually high, and on average, the whole thing is going down. We cannot infer what is happening to the ship just by what is happening to one part. We must look at the entire ship. It seems that at least one US Senator did not understand this relationship between the environment’s local extremes and global means when he found snow in front of the US capital, in February, and thought it meant that Global Warming had stopped.1 If he had watched the news that night, he might

California, battered by global warming’s weather whiplash, is fighting to stop it

In 1988 – the same year Nasa’s James Hansen warned Congress about the threats posed by human-caused global warming – water expert Peter Gleick wrote about the wet and dry extremes that it would create for California: California will get the worst of all possible worlds – more flooding in the winter, less available water in the summer. Three decades later, California has been ravaged by just this sort of weather whiplash. The state experienced its worst drought in over a millennium from 2012 to 2016, followed immediately by its

Stronger evidence for a weaker Atlantic overturning circulation

Through two new studies in Nature, the weakening of the Gulf Stream System is back in the scientific headlines. But even before that, interesting new papers have been published – high time for an update on this topic. Let’s start with tomorrow’s issue of Nature, which besides the two new studies (one of which I was involved in) also includes a News&Views commentary. Everything revolves around the question of whether the Gulf Stream System has already weakened. Climate models predict this will be one consequence of global warming – alongside

The Alsup Aftermath

The presentations from the Climate Science tutorial last month have all been posted (links below), and Myles Allen (the first presenter for the plaintiffs) gives his impression of the events. Guest Commentary by Myles Allen A few weeks ago, I had an unusual — and challenging — assignment: providing a one-hour “tutorial” on the basic science of human-induced climate change to a Federal District Court in San

‘We’re still in:’ From meme to movement with Microsoft, WWF, Ceres & Ingersoll Rand

Sustainability leaders discuss following through with their Paris Agreement goals, despite the US’ withdrawal. Find insights from Marty Spitzer of WWF, Anne Kelly of Ceres, Jim Hanna of Microsoft and Holly Emerson of Ingersoll Rand.

Why the energy finance cycle is prime for disruption

Here’s what industry leaders say that the renewable energy market’s quick expansion means.

To save marine habitats, conservationists find natural ally: surfers

Hundreds of areas with world-class waves also contain a variety of diverse marine species.

Want to fight climate change? Read these 3 books first

Climate change can seem like an impossibly large problem — what can any one of us do? Three recent books can help point the way.

2018 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #18

A chronological listing of news articles posted on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week. Editor’s Pick Earth’s atmosphere just crossed another troubling climate change threshold Recent CO2 measurements at Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography) For the first time since humans have been monitoring, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide have exceeded 410 parts per million averaged across an entire month, a threshold that pushes the planet ever closer to warming beyond levels that scientists and the international community have deemed “safe.” The reading

Global warming will depress economic growth in Trump country

A working paper recently published by the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond concludes that global warming could significantly slow economic growth in the US. Specifically, rising summertime temperatures in the hottest states will curb economic growth. And the states with the hottest summertime temperatures are all located in the South: Florida, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, Arkansas, and Arizona. All of these states voted for Donald Trump in 2016. This paper is consistent with a 2015 Nature study that found an optimal temperature range for economic activity. Economies thrive in regions with an

The Ecology Ethic

Nature Our one shared living biosphere is collapsing and dying. Continued being depends urgently upon reconnecting with nature through global embrace of an ecology ethic whose individual affirmative outcomes for natural ecosystems are sufficient in sum to sustain the global environment. A primary ethical measure of a person is the degree to which their lifestyle positively or negatively impacts nature. “Ecology is the meaning of life. Truth, justice, equity, and sustainability are the ideals whereby ecology is maintained.” – Dr. Glen Barry “A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise.” – Aldo Leopod, The Land Ethic

Absolute Radical Green Freedom

Big Brother is not your friend On the rise of high-tech global authoritarianism, as freedom and ecosystems fail, and Amerika falls into Russian and Chinese style tyranny “Nothing is so unworthy of a civilised nation as allowing itself to be governed without opposition by an irresponsible clique that has yielded to base instinct.” – The White Rose, Hitler Resistance Pamphlet “If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot

Nenana Ice Classic 2018

Another year, another ice out date. As in previous years, here’s an update of the Nenana Ice Classic time series (raw date, and then with a small adjustment for the calendrical variations in ‘spring’). One time series doesn’t prove much, but this is of course part of a much larger archive of phenomenological climate-related data that I’ve talked about before. This year the ice on the Tanana River went out on May 1st, oddly enough the same date as last year, after another very warm (but quite snowy) Alaskan winter. My shadow bet on whether any climate contrarian site will mention this dataset remains in play (none have

Climate indicators

The climate system is complex, and a complete description of its state would require huge amounts of data. However, it is possible to keep track of its conditions through summary statistics. There are some nice resources which give an overview of a number for climate indicators. Some examples include NASA and The Climate Reality Project. The most common indicator is the atmospheric background CO2 concentration, the global mean temperature, the global mean sea level, and the area with snow or Arctic sea ice. Other indicators include rainfall statistics, drought indices, or other hydrological aspects. The EPA provides some examples. One challenge has been that the state of the hydrological cycle is not as easily summarised

Solar for renters? This startup is taking on the challenge of ‘split incentives’

The seed-stage venture, born at Yale University, plans to pilot its idea in New Haven this summer.

Conventional shipping gets on deck for decarbonization

International shipping produces as much CO2 as aircraft. Here’s what we can do about that.

The keys to stakeholder engagement: start with building trust

Being on time is one way to build trust, but so is letting down your hair once in a while.