From Atlanta to Denver, Emrgy offers plug-and-play hope for hydropower

CEO Emily Morris is proving there’s a market for distributed energy that harnesses clean power from canals.

100% Renewable Energy Worldwide Isn’t Just Possible—It’s Also More Cost-Effective

By Lorraine Chow Transitioning the world to 100 percent renewable electricity isn’t just some environmentalist pipe dream—it’s “feasible at every hour throughout the year” and is more cost-effective than the current system, which largely relies on fossil fuels and nuclear energy, a new study claims. The research, compiled by Finland’s Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) and the Berlin-based nonprofit Energy Watch Group (EWG), was presented Wednesday at the Global Renewable Energy Solutions Showcase , a stand

Renewable Energy Isn’t Perfect, But It’s Far Better Than Fossil Fuels

In their efforts to discredit renewable energy and support continued fossil fuel burning, many anti-environmentalists have circulated a dual image purporting to compare a lithium mine with an oil sands operation. It illustrates the level of dishonesty to which some will stoop to keep us on our current polluting, climate-disrupting path (although in some cases it could be ignorance). The

Free Online Tool Lets You Assess Dam Projects Around the World

By Claire Salisbury Mega-dam construction is booming around the world, with promoters hyping hydropower as a green, renewable source of energy and a means of curbing climate change . But as these dams are built in the Amazon , Mekong and elsewhere, they’re doing great environmental and social damage and their green credentials are no longer adding up . For example, high quantities of greenhouse gases are released

How New Dams in Amazon Put Entire World at Risk

By Tim Radford What’s considered by some to be clean energy could devastate the Amazon, according to new research. A massive increase in hydropower from a series of planned Amazon dams could harm the world’s most important rainforest all the way from the slopes of the Andes to the Atlantic Ocean. Altogether, 428 dams are being built or are under consideration along the network of rivers that drain—and nourish—6 million square kilometers of forest spanning nine countries. Of these, around 140 are already finished or under construction. The Amazon is home to four of the world’s 10 largest rivers. Of the 34 largest tropical rivers, 20 are in the Amazon region, and these

Reconsidering the sustainability of hydropower

A new framework makes it more straightforward to evaluate projects against more than 20 social, environmental, technical and economic factors.

Trump Doesn’t Know A Damn Thing About Dams

Donald Trump finally opened his mouth about dams and hydropower last week. The result is as bad as you can imagine. Daniel Dale, Washington correspondent for the Toronto Star, tweeted what Trump had to say: “Hydropower is great, great, form of power—we don’t even talk about it, because to get the environmental permits are virtually impossible. It’s one of the best things you can do—hydro. But we don’t talk about it anymore.” But, once again, Trump is dead wrong. Here are the problems with hydropower worldwide: Kills rivers Kills and endangers fish and

Germany Converts Coal Mine Into Giant Renewable Energy Battery

Germany is embarking on an innovative project to turn a hard coal mine into a giant battery that can store surplus solar and wind energy and release it when supplies are lean. The Prosper-Haniel coal mine in the German state of North-Rhine Westphalia will be converted into a 200 megawatt pumped-storage hydroelectric reservoir that acts like a giant battery . The capacity is enough to power more than 400,000 homes, Governor Hannelore Kraft said, according to Bloomberg . Pumped storage plan University of Duisburg-Essen Founded in 1863, the Prosper-Haniel coal mine produces 3,000,000t/y of coal and is one of the few active coal mines remaining in Germany. But the mine is slated for closure in 2018, when federal subsidies

7 Wild Rivers Under Attack by Hydropower Dams

By Gary Wockner and Lydia Bleifuss Hydropower , falsely sold to the public as a source of “green” or “clean” energy, is expanding at an alarming rate in many of South America’s beautiful and ecologically pristine rivers. In line with a global trend, many South American governments—backed by multi-national hydropower corporations, international financiers and profit-motivated corruption—continue to endorse hydropower developments as ” renewable ” sources of energy despite public opposition and dramatic negative environmental impacts. Hydropower destroys rivers, often forces the relocation of local communities

It’s Official: Hydropower Is Dirty Energy

Over the last two years, I’ve written four articles about the massive problem with methane emissions from hydropower dams and reservoirs. Finally, the mainstream media covered this story Thursday after an international team of scientists released a new study that synthesizes more than 100 scholarly articles on the topic. The Seattle Times headline read, “Hydropower Isn’t Carbon Neutral After All” and the Washington Post headline read, “Oh Great—Scientists Have Confirmed A Key New Source Of Greenhouse Gases” The scientific

Free the Snake River, Remove the Dams

Buck Ryan, the Snake River Waterkeeper , put it this way, “Removing hydroelectric dams is progress—we no longer have to destroy rivers and kill endangered fish to keep the lights on.” As I paddled my kayak amidst the hundreds of people in the Free The Snake flotilla last weekend, I believe Ryan is on the right track. Dams are a 50 to 100 year old technology—it’s time to remove even more dams along America’s diminished waterways and replace that