End-of-summer reading list: 4 staff picks

As summer draws to a close, here are the five environmental books Conservation International staff can’t put down.

In global climate change fight, half a degree could make all the difference

Scientists say if Earth’s temperature were to warm any more than 1.5°C, we would experience devastating losses.

Sustainable coffee: What it really means

What does sustainably grown coffee mean?

In case you missed it: 4 big stories from our world

Human Nature shares four stories from the past week that you should know about.

Can Green Living Really Make You Happier? – E/The Environmental Magazine

E/The Environmental MagazineCan Green Living Really Make You Happier?E/The Environmental MagazineGreen living means anything from using natural light, improving air quality inside and shopping with reusable bags instead of plastic ones. For example, eating more organic products as opposed to meat and processed food counts as green living.

Iowa State celebrates ten years of sustainability initiative ‘Live Green!’ – Iowa State Daily

Iowa State DailyIowa State celebrates ten years of sustainability initiative 'Live Green!'Iowa State DailyThis academic year marks 10 years of the "Live Green!" Initiative at Iowa State. To celebrate, the Office of Sustainability will be hosting events every month highlighting different aspects of the campus-wide initiative. The "Live Green!" movement …

20 Longest Rivers in the World by Continent (For Your World Travel Bucket List)

Did you know that less than three percent of all the water in the world is freshwater? Of that, nearly 99% is stored in glaciers, ice caps, and underground. In other words, freshwater on the surface of the earth only makes up a fraction of one percent of the planet’s water. Whether despite this fact or because of it, travelers are captivated by continental waterways all around the world. Rivers are perhaps the most romantic of them all. They cascade

Protecting the planet’s freshwater: 3 things you need to know 

Nature-based solutions were mainstream at last week’s Stockholm World Water Week.

52 Percent of World’s Birds of Prey Populations in Decline

Grim news for the world’s raptors—an iconic group of birds consisting of hawks, falcons, kites, eagles, vultures and owls. After analyzing the status of all 557 raptor species, biologists discovered that 18 percent of these birds are threatened with extinction and 52 percent have declining global populations, making them more threatened than all birds as a whole. Comparatively, 40 percent of the world’s 11,000 bird species are in decline, according to an April report from BirdLife International. The new

40 Best Backpacks for Travelers

As responsible travelers who travel light and never check our bags (unless the airline forces us to), carryon luggage is essential for transporting our gear. The value of a good rolling bag can never be overstated, but having a great backpack is arguably even more important. Think about it: Your carryon roller takes a leading role in getting your gear to

Energy Transfer Pipeline Explodes in Pennsylvania

A pipeline exploded in Beaver County, Pennsylvania at approximately 5 a.m. Monday morning, causing a large fire and prompting the evacuation of dozens of homes in the area. The 24-inch natural gas line, owned by Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners and its subsidiary Sunoco, was buried three feet deep and activated only a week ago on Sept. 3. The valves to the pipeline were shut off and the fire extinguished itself by 7 a.m., the company

For climate expert, California summit will be momentous homecoming

Conservation International’s Climate Change Lead Shyla Raghav discusses California’s climate goals and the Global Climate Action Summit.

2018 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #35

Calls to Action… Story of the Week… Editorial of the Week… El Niño/La Niña Update… Toon of the Week… Coming Soon on SkS… Climate Feedback Reviews… SkS Week in Review… Poster of the Week… Calls to Action*… Looking ahead… Sat Sep 8 is an extremely important day for climate activists because they will be gathering in cities throughout the world to Rise Up for Climate. If you re not already plugged into an event in your area, you can easily do so by going to the official Rise Up for Climate website. From the global campaign’s website: On September 8, we’re planning thousands of rallies in

New study concludes that jet air dryers should not be used in hospitals

They do a terrific job of taking bacteria from your hands and spreading it all over the walls and floors.

Centuries-old distillery converted into multipurpose co-working space

It comes with a tiny bar, housed in the distillery’s old elevator.

2018 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #36

Story of the Week… Editorial of the Week… Toon of the Week… Quote of the Week… Coming Soon on SkS… John Cook Sighting… SkS Week in Review… Poster of the Week… Story of the Week… Rise for Climate: thousands march across US to protest environment crisis Protests spearheaded by march in San Francisco ahead of climate change summit in the city next week Several thousand people took part in a climate march in New York City on Thursday. Ten activists were arrested after blocking the street in front of Andrew Cuomo’s Manhattan office. Photograph: Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/REX/Shutterstock Tens of thousands of people took part in marches and

California’s response to record wildfires: shift to 100% clean energy

In America today, it’s rare to see political leaders respond to a threat with an appropriate evidence-based policy solution. At the national level, more often we see actions that aggravate existing problems or create new ones. California – the country’s most populous and economically powerful state – has been a welcome exception. California has been battered by extreme weather intensified by climate change. From 2012 to 2016 the state was scorched by its worst drought in over a millennium. Weather whiplash struck in 2017, when much of the state broke precipitation records. This combination led to devastating

Rising CO2 levels could push ‘hundreds of millions’ into malnutrition by 2050

This is a re-post from Carbon Brief by Daisy Dunne An additional 290 million people could face malnutrition by 2050 if little is done to stop the rise of greenhouse gas emissions, a study finds. The increased presence of CO2 in the atmosphere could cause staple crops to produce smaller amounts of nutrients such as zinc, iron and protein, the researchers say. Using international datasets of food consumption, the study estimates that these changes could cause an additional 175 million people to be zinc deficient and an additional 122 million people to be protein deficient by

Does a slow AMOC increase the rate of global warming?

Established understanding of the AMOC (sometimes popularly called Gulf Stream System) says that a weaker AMOC leads to a slightly cooler global mean surface temperature due to changes in ocean heat storage. But now, a new paper in Nature claims the opposite and even predicts a phase of rapid global warming. What’s the story? By Stefan Rahmstorf and Michael Mann In 1751, the captain of an English slave-trading

Inside the global war on plastic pollution

How did we get here? Where is all this going?

A report from the European Meteorological Society’s annual meeting 2018

If you want to make a difference as a scientist, you need to make sure that people understand the importance of your work. Conferences give you one opportunity to explain what you’ve found out. I sometimes wonder if the value of attending conferences is sufficiently appreciated. You can save time getting an overview over your field of research and catch up on the latest developments, which would take many weeks just from

BASF drives change in the palm-oil supply chain

Sponsored: Corporate accountability is key to fostering a sustainable and equitable palm-oil industry.

Why 2020 is such an urgent milestone for the planet

There’s a direct connection between healthy forests and grasslands, and climate change.